DOE report announces that 2018 International Energy Conservation Code helps produce cost savings

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) will improve energy efficiency in residential buildings. In support of this determination, DOE conducted technical analysis evaluating the impacts of the updated code relative to the previous 2015 edition. DOE estimates national savings of approximately:

  • 1.97 percent energy cost savings
  • 1.91 percent source energy savings
  • 1.68 percent site energy savings

Additional related information is available at Regulations.gov. Upon publication of an affirmative determination, states are required to certify that they have reviewed the provisions of their residential building code regarding energy efficiency, and made a determination as to whether it is appropriate for them to revise their code to meet or exceed the updated edition of the IECC. Click here for a Building Safety Journal news feature on the IECC authored by Michelle Britt, ICC Director of Energy Programs.

2019 ICC Annual Conference

Have you answered the survey yet for online remote voting on ICC Annual Conference business?

If you haven’t done so yet, you can participate in a brief survey on allowing voting members to participate in online remote voting to transact Code Council business during the ICC Annual Conference. Code Council Board President Bryant set a goal this year to assess the feasibility of online remote voting during the Annual Business Meeting. The concept of online remote voting would include Code Council Board of Directors elections and bylaw amendments. As part of this exploratory initiative, President Bryant appointed the Ad Hoc Committee on ABM Business & Elections, whose first priority is to obtain membership input and guidance. To participate in this effort, please complete this brief survey.

Grenfell Tower fire expert to deliver keynote address at the 2019 ICC Annual Conference in Las Vegas

Dame Judith Hackitt, a world renowned expert on the Grenfell Tower fire, will deliver the keynote address at this year’s Annual Conference. Her report “Building a Safer Future” was published in May 2018. Dame Judith Hackitt is a chemical engineer and is currently Chair of EEF, the UK manufacturers’ organization. She has been making presentations to audiences around the world on the tragic 2017 high rise fire in England which killed 72 people. The 2019 ICC Annual Conference will be October 20-23, preceding the Public Comment Hearings on Group B codes October 23-30, all at the Rio Hotel & Convention Center in Las Vegas.

ICC Government Relations’ Ryan Colker outlines how codes are nation’s foundation

International Code Council Vice President of Innovation Ryan Colker discusses the role building codes play in establishing resiliency in an article in Masonry Magazine. “The ability for buildings to contribute to community resilience depends on the standards they are built to,” Colker writes. “As presented in the recent ICC and ANCR publication, Building Community Resilience through Modern Model Building Codes, well-constructed buildings, designed to the latest building codes, are a significant factor in avoiding and reducing potential losses when disaster strikes. Communities cannot be resilient without resilient buildings.” Click here to read this important article.

Emory R. Rodgers Fellowship enables building safety professionals to advance their leadership skills

The International Code Council recently announced a new fellowship to commemorate the life and legacy of Emory R. Rodgers. This fellowship enables deserving building safety professionals to advance their leadership skills by attending a nationally recognized executive development program. The fellowship covers up to $20,000 toward the full cost of the educational program and the award recipient’s travel to and from the program. For more on the program and the compelling legacy left by Mr. Rodgers, click here for the Building Safety Journal feature story. Applications are due by June 30, 2019, to Karla Higgs at khiggs@iccsafe.org or 900 Montclair Road, Birmingham, AL, 35213.

ICC Government Relations assigns new PMG Technical Resources Team to states across the nation

In order to serve our ICC Members better, the ICC has added a few positions to the Government Relations Department. These Technical Resources Team Members will assist your Government Relations Regional Managers in the field. The team members and their assigned states can be seen in this map. They are responsible for developing, coordinating and implementing programs to ensure the successful completion of the ICC Government Relations’ goals and objectives as they apply to the Plumbing, Mechanical and Fuel Gas (PMG) I-Codes and related services and programs of the International Code Council.  This includes  training and education, providing the subject matter expertise to Government Relations Managers as well as representing ICC at the PMG Chapter meetings, state plumbing and mechanical boards, task forces, committees and councils where PMG subject knowledge is required.

REPORT: Structurlam cross-laminated timber products are compliant with existing codes, standards

The ICC Evaluation Service (ICC-ES) and the Engineered Wood Association (APA) released their first joint evaluation report for cross-laminated timber products (CLT). This program certifies CLT products for compliance with ICC-ES Acceptance Criteria for Cross-Laminated Timber Panels for Use as Components in Floor and Roof Decks (AC455) and ANSI/APA PRG 320 Standard for Performance-Rated Cross-Laminated Timber. The joint evaluation report, ESR-3631, was issued in September 2018 to Structurlam Mass Timber Corporation for its Structurlam CrossLam CLT panels. Read more here

‘Best Practices’ submissions sought by the ICC Major Jurisdictions Committee to spotlight innovations

The ICC Major Jurisdiction Committee (MJC) invites major jurisdictions to submit “Best Practices” that your jurisdiction has successfully used in a code administration environment. Best practices are professional procedures that are accepted or prescribed as being correct or most effective. For examples of Best Practices, visit the Best Practices Guide on the MJC website. After review by the MJC Steering Committee, outstanding contributions will be posted as examples of code officials helping one another. All submittals need to be submitted in the same format to simplify the search process. Please review this linked form for your “Best Practices” submission. You can submit your forms via email at mjc@iccsafe.org.  If you have any other comments or questions, submit them to mjc@iccsafe.org.

Alaska’s top elected officials praise building codes as preventing far worse damages from earthquake

Recent comments by leading elected officials point to building codes having minimized damages from a massive 7.0 magnitude earthquake that hit Anchorage, Alaska, on November 30th and contributed to a rapid post-disaster recovery. The Alaska earthquake did not result in any collapsed buildings, widespread damage to infrastructure or loss of life, partially due to the strong building codes the state adopts – the International Codes (I-Codes). Comments include:

  • Governor Bill Walker praised the state’s building codes while commenting on minor damages to his own home: “Building codes mean something.”
  • Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz credited building codes for minimizing structural damage and said, “Considering the scale of earthquake, the extent of damage was relatively small.”
  • U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski stated, “We have worked as communities in our state to be prepared for disasters when they should come. We have some of the most stringent building codes in the world, and for the most part, our buildings held up.”
  • U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan said, “We were fortunate that there were no deaths…Given how many earthquakes we have had over the years, we have learned a lot. The first thing we learned is about building codes. Fortunately–again, thank God–we had no buildings collapse. We have a lot of structures–homes, businesses, schools–that have severe structural damage, but a collapsing building is where you get a lot of deaths…Strong, strict building codes…[help] to prevent that.”

These results are consistent with several studies that demonstrate that well-enforced building codes help mitigate earthquake risk.